A Comparison of Writer’s Methods in ‘The Whole Town’s Sleeping’ by Ray Bradbury, ‘A Terribly Stra

A Comparison of Writer’s Methods in ‘The Whole Town’s Sleeping’ by Ray Bradbury, ‘A Terribly Strange Bed’ by Wilkie Collins and ‘The Landlady’ by Roald Dahl

In this essay I will be comparing 3 short stories: ‘The Entire Town’s Sleeping’ by Ray Bradbury (1950), ‘A Terribly Strange Bed’ by Wilkie Collins (1856) and ‘The Landlady’ by Roald Dahl (1960). These three texts are all from the fear genre. Fear Stories are stories that make us really feel worry (or are supposed to), they make the reader scared or frightened. Stories that make us frightened have been well-liked with men and women for hundreds of years, with kids for the reason that they are thrilling and make you so caught up in the story that you become genuinely scared as if you are truly the individual in the story, and adults due to the fact the stories develop into rather emotional and often incredibly memorable. This tends to make it significantly a lot more interesting than a lot of other stories. I chose these stories for the reason that they would be very easily comparable as they all have the similar objective, which is so scare you. I am going to examine the way Ray Bradbury, Wilkie Collins and Roald Dahl use figurative language and how they make tension and suspense, and mood and tone, during the openings of their 3 quick stories.

In the initial few lines of ‘The Complete Town’s Sleeping’, the author describes the setting for a standard worry story, “the little town was deep far away from almost everything, kept to itself by a river and a forest and a ravine”, but before that he mentions an additional issue that is required for a standard fear story, the reality that it is night time. All 3 of the stories I am studying are set at evening. This is due to the fact it was set in the daytime it basically wouldn’t be scary. The entire town wouldn’t be sleeping, the narrator wouldn’t require a terribly strange bed to sleep in, and Billy Weaver wouldn’t be looking for a landlady. Collins has a distinctive approach for the starting of ‘A Terribly Strange Bed’, he describes the characters and what they were doing, which offers a different impression of the story, it does not seem like a scary story at initial, due to the fact there are no apparent indicators like in ‘The Whole Town’s Sleeping’. ‘The Landlady’ is related to Collins’ story, simply because of the description of the most important character (‘Billy Weaver’), but is also related to…

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